Autonomous Underwater Vehicles Auvs News

Image Credit: Kongsberg

Kongsberg Develops New LARS for HUGIN AUVs

Norway's Kongsberg Maritime has developed a new LARS (Launch and Recovery System) solution for its HUGIN range of Autonomous Underwater Vehicles (AUVs), which it says will bring "a series of far-reaching operational improvements."Kongsberg has decided to have the new LARS operating from midships, with the release and capture of HUGIN marine robots occurring beneath the sea surface."Launching and recovering AUVs underwater, away from the splash zone, lessens the possibility of their being damaged, while midships deployment averts any likelihood of AUVs being run over by the launch

Image Credit - Sea-Kit

Fugro, Sea-Kit in Uncrewed Surface Vessel Team-Up

Dutch offshore survey company Fugro has teamed up with SEA-KIT, winner of the Shell Ocean Discovery XPRIZE, to develop a new range of agile and compact uncrewed surface vessels (USVs) which can deploy remotely operated vehicles (ROVs) and autonomous underwater vehicles (AUVs) for marine asset inspections. Fugro and SEA-KIT plan to accelerate the development and use of uncrewed vessels, remotely operated from Fugro’s remote operations centers, to improve safety, efficiency, and reduce the environmental impact on marine activities. The new range of USVs will consume up to 95 % less fuel than

Ocean Infinity Wraps 'First in Industry' Survey Offshore Angola

a survey contract with the French oil major Total, in Angola, achieving what it describes as a first such survey in the industry."The project was the first time that geophysical, geotechnical, and seismic data has been gathered at the same time," Ocean Infinity said.Ocean Infinity used its Autonomous Underwater Vehicles (AUVs) with geotechnical and seismic equipment based from one surface vessel. "The successful completion of this project, which was all done from one vessel and on a single cruise out to the project site, is a major breakthrough in maximizing efficiency on sub-sea

The Riptide AUV (Credit BAE Systems)

Good Undersea Vehicles Come in Small Packages

small packages.” Does this hold true for today’s undersea vehicles? Indeed it does. One of the most striking recent trends in the field is the proliferation of compact and affordable, yet highly effective, undersea vehicles. The past decade has seen new remotely operated vehicles (ROVs) and autonomous underwater vehicles (AUVs) produced that are easily carried and deployed by one person. Capitalizing on developments in circuitry, sensors, and batteries inspired by the consumer electronics sector, these small vehicles punch above their weight class in practical applications.There are many examples

Dr Phil Anderson and his kayak. Photo from SAMS.

@ SAMS, Science + Autonomy = Answers

Few sea and ocean-related research projects today do not involve some form of underwater robotic or marine autonomous system. Elaine Maslin reports on how they’re being used by the Scottish Association of Marine Science.Whether it’s large autonomous underwater vehicles (AUVs), remotely operated vehicles (ROVs), gliders, landers, small man-portable AUV systems and even air-borne vehicles, unmanned systems have become a day-to-day tool. And, while ready built systems are now readily available, easy access to components is enabling researchers to assemble bespoke platforms to meet specific

Sonardyne Acquires 2G Robotics

marine technology company Sonardyne International announced it has acquired Canadian underwater imaging and inspection specialist 2G Robotics.2G Robotics will join the Sonardyne group of companies, while remaining an independent business and brand, continuing to serve its customer base in unmanned and autonomous underwater vehicles (AUVs) and remotely operated vehicles (ROVs). 2G Robotics’ founder Jason Gillham will continue to lead the company as Chief Executive Officer.The acquisition of 2G Robotics is the latest step in Sonardyne’s long-term growth strategy and follows the acquisition of

NotiloPlus’ Seasam AUV has been operating around the world. Photo from NotiloPlus.

Subsea Tech's 'March of Miniaturization'

A growing battalion of small, compact systems is marching in on the subsea world, in some ways making it a bigger space for more to enter. Elaine Maslin reports.Smaller remotely operated vehicles (ROVs) and smaller autonomous underwater vehicles (AUVs) are growing in number and in turn driving smaller technologies that support them. The result is a few new kids on the block and what you could call a rising march of miniaturization.They span from vehicle manufacturers to acoustic and optical sensor system makers. A number of these attended a demonstration event focused on unmanned systems in the

Image: Saipem

Subsea IMR Moves Robotic

Unmanned maritime systems (UMS), especially autonomous underwater vehicles (AUVs), are no stranger to commercial applications. Survey of the seafloor by AUVs and subsequently unmanned surface vehicles (USVs) is now an accepted practice. UMS technology is moving into new commercial domains, notably inspection maintenance and repair (IMR). While there are no perfect definitions these tasks can be viewed as follows:Inspection is the task of examining a structure, perhaps a pipeline, to determine its condition.Maintenance is a routine task involving interaction with a structure, such as turning a valve or

Participants on the expedition, from left Stian Rolfsen Gilje and Solveig Lie Onstad from the K. G. Jebsen Centre for Deep Sea Research (UiB), Jan Stenløkk from the NPD and Anna Lim from NTNU. Photo: NPD

NPD Completes Seabed Minerals Expedition

task of mapping and proving deep sea mineral deposits by the Ministry of Petroleum and Energy. The Act relating to mineral activity on the Norwegian continental shelf (the Seabed Minerals Act) came into force on 1 July 2019.A total of 3900 line kilometres of geophysical seabed data was acquired using Autonomous Underwater Vehicles (AUVs) Three AUVs were in operation simultaneously, collecting data as they passed about 50 m above the seabed at a speed of 3 knots. The AUVs operated independently for two days at the time away from the mother vessel.This data acquisition has provided important geophysical

The bespoke drill rig being lowered over the side of the RRS James Cook. The rig is designed to push the curved steel pipe into the seabed sediment. Image: Copyright STEMM-CCS Project

Increased Confidence in CO2 Storage

the sound made by streams of bubbles or  spot them with cameras, while chemical sensors ‘sniffed out’  the CO2 and the minute amounts of inert chemical tracers it contained, so allowing the scientists to  differentiate this signal from any naturally occurring CO2. ROVs and autonomous underwater vehicles (AUVs) bearing other sensors completed the arsenal of technology employed. The team aboard were extremely pleased and gratified that the sensors and monitoring tools they were testing performed far better than expected. This has resulted in some surety that even very small releases

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