Electric Systems News

SMD Quantum EV. Photo: SMD

Remotely Operated Vehicles: Thinking out of the Box

All electric systems are starting to free companies from the traditional strict form factors that ROVs traditionally take. With a more flexible modular harness, vehicles can be built from standardised building blocks. Saab Seaeye, a firm well versed in all-electric vehicles, has been making noises in this direction, using the smarts it’s been developing for the Sabertooth for new electric vehicles.Another firm looking to enter the resident vehicle space is UK-based subsea machinery firm SMD. During Offshore Europe, it launched its Quantum EV ROV. While the Quantum EV ROV made the headlines

Martin McDonald, Senior Vice President, ROV Division, Oceaneering International.
Courtesy of Oceaneering International

One-on-One with Martin McDonald, SVP, ROV Division, Oceaneering

;s a balance between hydraulic and electric propulsion systems. We will see electric manipulators coming into play, reducing the reliance on hydraulic systems. ROVs today still require some heavy-duty pumping and intervention capabilities, so that’s the challenge between getting the all-electric systems vs. hydraulic systems. Today, for example, electric manipulators offer less than 50% of the lift capability and efficiency of a hydraulic manipulator.We’re talking specifically about ROVs, but critical components of the ROV system are the handling systems and reliability of the deepwater

(Photo: ROVOP)

ROVOP Acquires M2 Subsea's ROV Fleet

(ROVs) operator ROVOP announced it has purchase of the entire fleet of 28 ROV systems from competitor M2 Subsea.Following a technical review, 19 of the systems meet the ROVOP standard and will be added to its fleet, increasing the firm's ROV fleet to 51, including 34 hydraulic systems and 17 electric systems.The 11 remaining ROVs will either be decommissioned or sold.ROVOP CEO Steven Gray said, “The addition of these ROV systems to the fleet will enable ROVOP to better support customers with the appropriate ROVs for their requirements based on capability and greater cost efficiency. This increased

(Image: ABB)

Powering the Seafloor: Put a Socket in It

, instead of hosting it on platforms. On the seafloor, equipment, including pumps and compressors, would be more effective and efficient at boosting production rates. Reduced reliance on platforms would also help reduce oil firms’ footprints, reducing pollution risk and CO2 emissions. All-electric systems would also provide more responsive control and advanced health monitoring of subsea equipment.But, this new infrastructure could support more than pumps, compressors and actuators. It could also be used to support a growing fleet of unmanned underwater vehicles, as well as supporting other industries

Concept: The Icebreaking Submarine (Image: Novan Research)

MTR100: Novan Research

its destination. A surface icebreaker ship needs tremendous power and weight to move forward to break thick ice while the submarine icebreaker only needs to adjust its buoyancy and may need less powerful engines to break ice. Power options could include gas powered turbines, conventional diesel electric systems or nuclear power.   The submerged submarine icebreaker can rise to the surface breaking through the ice above by using its buoyancy power to rise. It can then be propelled using its propulsion power and buoyancy to break a path through the ice as it moves through the ice field. The submarine

Vulkan RATO for Submarine Test Rig

For decades, Vulkan  has been a supplier of couplings, not only for Brazilian offshore industry, but also for military applications. Here business mainly focused on conventional drives such as diesel-electric systems for military ships and submarines. Now Vulkan is positioning itself on the Brazilian market as a system solution provider for nuclear propulsion and supply the Centro Experimental Aramar in Iperó with a RATO S 731T and 14 elastic mounts. The Brazilian government is currently planning the construction of a fleet of six submarines with nuclear propulsion. The existing fleet

ABB Wins $26m Marine Repeat Order

chose ABB as the main supplier of power and propulsion systems and are already building two identical seismic vessels based on the first order from 2011, which will be ready for delivery in the first and fourth quarter of 2013. "Being selected as the main supplier of power and diesel electric systems for this unique vessel series once again, shows the customer's faith in our ability to execute complex projects and deliver reliable solutions, that contribute to increased energy efficiency and optimized performance,” said Veli-Matti Reinikkala, head of ABB’s Process Automation

Marine Technology Magazine Cover Jun 2020 -

Marine Technology Reporter is the world's largest audited subsea industry publication serving the offshore energy, subsea defense and scientific communities.

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