Office Of Naval Research News

At 88 years young, Capt. Walsh still runs the day-to-day operations of International Maritime, a consulting company he established in 1976.
Image Courtesy Don Walsh.

Trieste: 60th Anniversary of Deepest Dive

Plunging into the deep, dark abyss of the Pacific Ocean’s Mariana Trench, U.S. Navy Lt. Don Walsh and Swiss engineer Jacques Piccard heard a loud cracking sound in their vessel—the bathyscaphe Trieste, which the Office of Naval Research (ONR) purchased for scientific observations.Already 30,000 feet below sea level, Walsh and Piccard faced the ultimate decision—risk their lives to become the first people to travel to the deepest part of the ocean, the Challenger Deep, or return to safety.The crack had scarred one of Trieste’s outer plexiglass panels. Walsh and Piccard (whose

We enjoyed tunes from a VJ in the MoPOP Sky Church at the Gala. (Photo courtesy of Rick A. Smith)

Industry Event OCEANS 2019 Seattle A Success

research institutions and private researchers gathered a small fleet of research vessels at Seattle’s waterfront marina for tours on Monday . . . a classic fall day with bright blue skies and cool, crisp air.  Some of the popular features of the conference continued, including the Office of Naval Research and Integrated Ocean Observing Systems sponsored Student Poster Competition (see article elsewhere in this edition), several special Town Halls on key topics such as marine debris and plastics, and a Gala reception at an iconic location – the Frank Gehry-designed Museum of Popular

NATO’s 3,100-ton, 305-foot research vessel NRV Alliance has been a leading platform for underwater acoustics research to the benefit of NATO navies. Photo: NATO CMRE

NATO RV Alliance is not just quiet, it’s ice-capable

, and we’ve been successful with it, particularly with institutes and academia, most notably in the U.S., which now have access to this world-class platform.  I spend a proportion of my time meeting with the people from University-National Oceanographic Laboratory System (UNOLS), Office of Naval Research (ONR), National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), and other people who go to sea on a regular basis but don’t necessarily have the platforms available that they would like. So we’ve done a considerable amount of business with them.Nobody has a platform like

US Navy File Photo

#Oi2020 History

field. These systems are part of an equipment suite the U.S. Navy's Coastal Systems Station, Panama City, Fla., has developed to hunt underwater mines. "This is the latest technology in electro-optics laser systems,” according to Program Project Officer Cmdr. Spence Whitten, Office of Naval Research in Washington D.C.  “In fact, the system is still in the research and development phase. The system should provide searchers with the best resolution available today in locating underwater objects." The synthetic aperture sonar is a dual frequency model. The high frequency

R/V Roger Revelle Gets a Thruster Upgrade

.The R/V Roger Revelle is a globally capable oceanographic research vessel, designed as a platform to support many different facets of ocean-based scientific research. The vessel is owned by the US Navy and operated by the Scripps Institute of Oceanography under a charter agreement with the Office of Naval Research.  In the pursuit of its mission, the crew of the R/V Roger Revelle depends on world-class navigation and station-keeping systems on a daily basis.  To meet this need the vessel was built with a powerful propulsion system designed to keep it in position anywhere around the globe

Photo Credit: John F. Williams, US Navy

#Oi2020 History

In 2003, NOAA (with support from the Office of Naval Research), partnered to uncover the “secrets” of the USS Alligator—the U.S. Navy’s first submarine, which was considered “lost” at sea since April 1863. While the vessel represented a tremendous leap in naval engineering, both its design innovation and fate are still considered a “mystery.” The NOAA/ONR partnership was formed in the hopes of uncovering the answers to these questions, and attempts are still being made. The initial search expedition began with just a few key clues, specifically a letter

(U.S. Navy photo by John F. Williams)

#OI2020: FLIP(ped)

, today MTR presents one of the industry's more indelible images, the 55 feet that remain visible after the crew of the Floating Instrument Platform, or FLIP, partially flood the ballast tanks causing the vessel to turn stern first into the ocean. The 355-foot research vessel, owned by the Office of Naval Research and operated by the Marine Physical Laboratory at Scripps Institution of Oceanography at University of California, conducts investigations in a number of fields, including acoustics, oceanography, meteorology and marine mammal observation. Marine Technology Reporter has been commissioned

Aquanaut (Photo: Houston Mechatronics)

HMI to Develop AI-powered Subsea Manipulator Hands

US-based subsea robotics firm Houston Mechatronics, Inc. (HMI) said it has set out to develop Artificial Intelligence (AI) powered robotic hands for subsea manipulators, under a recent award from the Office of Naval Research (ONR).As technology matures, subsea systems such as autonomous underwater vehicles (AUV) and remotely operated underwater vehicles (ROV) are increasingly serving in more important roles for applications such as offshore oil and gas and underwater defense.However, despite many technological advances over recent years, robots in the ocean typically do not have the manipulation

SurfWec Artist Concept. Images Courtesy:  SurfWEC LLC.

Efficient Wave-Generated Power … Really!

the price tag today at $20 million to bring the system through sea trials, with (approximately) $2m for bench testing, $1m for computer modeling, $1m for a scale model, about $12m for the final prototype unit, and $4m for two-year sea trials.“I’ve just submitted a White Paper to the Office of Naval Research for that full budget,” said van Hemmen. “On the commercial side we will approach venture capital sources for funding, too. Then we have DOE applications in for subsystem development.”Think Global, Act (NJ) Local“Certain projects are so big that they need a national

Marine Technology Reporter published a supplement to celebrate the 50th anniversary of Oceanology International. Photo: MTR

Oi: Tracking 50 Years of Ocean Innovation

Underwater Recovery Vehicle’ (CURV),” recalls Jack Jaegar, who worked at Hydro Products and was a leading light in the Marine Technology Society. “This created the capability to perform deep-sea rescue operation and recover objects from the ocean floor.” The U.S. Office of Naval Research’s Floating Instrument Platform (FLIP) became famous at the time and the SEALAB II underwater habitat was in operation off the coast of California.At the same time, Loran-C was still being used for navigation – there was still plenty of room for improvement. “The Mallory

Marine Technology Magazine Cover Jan 2020 -

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