Office Of Naval Research News

A new MIT-developed search-and-rescue algorithm identifies hidden “traps” in ocean waters. The method may help quickly identify regions where objects — and missing people — may have converged. Image courtesy of the researchers/http://news.mit.edu/

Tech Talk: Algorithm Aims to Assist Ocean Search and Rescue

where the sea traps are. That’s important for when there’s a limited time window in which they have to respond, in hopes of a successful outcome.”This research was primarily funded by the National Science Foundation’s Hazards SEES program, with additional support from the Office of Naval Research and the German National Science Foundation

 Arthur John “A.J.” Reiss (Photo: NOAA)

Reiss Named Director of NOAA's Ocean Prediction Center

a retired Navy Captain who served most of his career as a Meteorology and Oceanography officer including command of a maritime forecast center after early shipboard assignments. He most recently held the position of Division Director of the Ocean Sensing & Systems Application Division at the Office of Naval Research. In this role he was responsible for leading the development and implementation of improved marine data, forecast and analysis applications for forecasters. Prior to that, he served as the Naval Deputy to NOAA for the Oceanographer of the Navy in Washington D.C. and served as a key advisor

Nortek and Del Mar Oceanographic are collaborating to give researchers from around the globe a cost-effective way to answer vital questions surrounding the functioning of ocean processes. Image: Nortek

Case Study: Helping Ocean Researchers Obtain Hi-Resolution Measurements at a Lower Cost

; Lucas reports, noting that the vertical movement of the platform presented a unique set of challenges that needed to be overcome during the Wirewalker’s development phase.The Wirewalker/Nortek combination has been used in several locations around the globe, including by the USA’s Office of Naval Research funded projects in the Bay of Bengal, the North Atlantic and North Pacific, as well as by the Scripps Institution of Oceanography off the coast of southern California, USA. The projects have covered two broad areas of research: 1) characterizing ocean mixed layer velocities free from the

A mussel holds onto a Teflon sheet by a tiny strand. Mussel Polymers Inc. (MPI) – a startup created by Wardenclyffe Chemicals Inc., a technology development company – is ready to take sea-inspired adhesives from Purdue to market. (Image courtesy: https://news.uns.purdue.edu)

Mussel Power: New Adhesives from Chem Start-up are Sea-Inspired

glue that mussels naturally use to attach to substrates in the ocean, and according to its creators represents the first new adhesive chemistry to reach the market in decades.The research effort that led to the development of PCS lasted over a decade and was supported with $2 million from the Office of Naval Research.The team behind Mussel Polymers Inc. licensed the technology through the Purdue Research Foundation’s Office of Technology Commercialization.“The entire Purdue Research Foundation and OTC teams were extraordinary in helping us move through the process of licensing this technology

At 88 years young, Capt. Walsh still runs the day-to-day operations of International Maritime, a consulting company he established in 1976.
Image Courtesy Don Walsh.

Trieste: 60th Anniversary of Deepest Dive

Plunging into the deep, dark abyss of the Pacific Ocean’s Mariana Trench, U.S. Navy Lt. Don Walsh and Swiss engineer Jacques Piccard heard a loud cracking sound in their vessel—the bathyscaphe Trieste, which the Office of Naval Research (ONR) purchased for scientific observations.Already 30,000 feet below sea level, Walsh and Piccard faced the ultimate decision—risk their lives to become the first people to travel to the deepest part of the ocean, the Challenger Deep, or return to safety.The crack had scarred one of Trieste’s outer plexiglass panels. Walsh and Piccard (whose

We enjoyed tunes from a VJ in the MoPOP Sky Church at the Gala. (Photo courtesy of Rick A. Smith)

Industry Event OCEANS 2019 Seattle A Success

research institutions and private researchers gathered a small fleet of research vessels at Seattle’s waterfront marina for tours on Monday . . . a classic fall day with bright blue skies and cool, crisp air.  Some of the popular features of the conference continued, including the Office of Naval Research and Integrated Ocean Observing Systems sponsored Student Poster Competition (see article elsewhere in this edition), several special Town Halls on key topics such as marine debris and plastics, and a Gala reception at an iconic location – the Frank Gehry-designed Museum of Popular

NATO’s 3,100-ton, 305-foot research vessel NRV Alliance has been a leading platform for underwater acoustics research to the benefit of NATO navies. Photo: NATO CMRE

NATO RV Alliance is not just quiet, it’s ice-capable

, and we’ve been successful with it, particularly with institutes and academia, most notably in the U.S., which now have access to this world-class platform.  I spend a proportion of my time meeting with the people from University-National Oceanographic Laboratory System (UNOLS), Office of Naval Research (ONR), National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), and other people who go to sea on a regular basis but don’t necessarily have the platforms available that they would like. So we’ve done a considerable amount of business with them.Nobody has a platform like

US Navy File Photo

#Oi2020 History

field. These systems are part of an equipment suite the U.S. Navy's Coastal Systems Station, Panama City, Fla., has developed to hunt underwater mines. "This is the latest technology in electro-optics laser systems,” according to Program Project Officer Cmdr. Spence Whitten, Office of Naval Research in Washington D.C.  “In fact, the system is still in the research and development phase. The system should provide searchers with the best resolution available today in locating underwater objects." The synthetic aperture sonar is a dual frequency model. The high frequency

R/V Roger Revelle Gets a Thruster Upgrade

.The R/V Roger Revelle is a globally capable oceanographic research vessel, designed as a platform to support many different facets of ocean-based scientific research. The vessel is owned by the US Navy and operated by the Scripps Institute of Oceanography under a charter agreement with the Office of Naval Research.  In the pursuit of its mission, the crew of the R/V Roger Revelle depends on world-class navigation and station-keeping systems on a daily basis.  To meet this need the vessel was built with a powerful propulsion system designed to keep it in position anywhere around the globe

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