Elaine Maslin News

AutoNaut now has 10 of its wave propelled vehicles.Image: AutoNaut

Drill Rig Noise: Entering the Exclusion Zone, Quietly

Unmanned surface vessels continue to make in-roads into new applications and industries. An ability to gather data in otherwise inaccessible locations is both increasing knowledge about marine noise and confidence in marine autonomous systems in the oil and gas industry. Elaine Maslin reports.Offshore oil and gas exploration and production activities have been going on since the mid-20th century. But the noise that drilling or production facilities emit into the marine environment and the impact they have on marine life isn’t perhaps as well quantified as it could be. That could be changing

MBARI researchers head out into Monterey Bay to deploy a long-range autonomous underwater vehicle (LR-AUV), an underwater robot that is programmed at the surface and then travels underwater for hundreds of miles, measuring water chemistry and collecting water samples as it goes.  Credit: Brian Kieft (c) 2015 MBARI

MBARI Works at Unlocking Ocean Biology

Greater understanding of what goes on in the ocean is starting to become a reality – thanks to growing use of unmanned surface and underwater vehicles and developments in biological sensing.  Elaine Maslin takes a look at what a team at MBARI has been doing.Gathering biological data from the oceans remains a significant challenge for oceanographers. Now, an increasing range of unmanned vehicles that are able to work together is becoming available, as is an ability to collect biological data using them.It sounds straight forward, but traditionally the collection and processing of biological

The San Juan, before she was lost. Source: Ocean Infinity

Ocean Infinity’s Hunt for the Submarine San Juan

The search for the Argentinian submarine was like hunting for the proverbial needle in a hay stack, except that it was a piece of straw. Elaine Maslin reports. At 7.19am, local time, on November 15, 2017, the last message was received from the San Juan submarine. She belonged to the Argentinian navy and was on a routine mission from Ushuaia in the Patagonia region to Mar del Plata in Buenos Aires province when she lost contact with the military.  Fifteen days later, neither the submarine nor any debris had been found and the crew of 44 sailors were presumed dead.  The loss made internatio

L3 Harris UK’s C-Worker 7 working with an ROV off the UK’s south coast. Photos from L3 Harris UK.

Marine Autonomy Above & Below the Water

Marine autonomous systems and combinations of such systems are being increasingly put to the test in the offshore space. Elaine Maslin looks at how hybrid remote and autonomous systems are now being tested.Concepts like resident subsea vehicles, for inspection, repair and maintenance, are attractive options, but not the only ones being tried. Deploying remotely operated vehicles (ROVs) from unmanned surface vessels (USVs) are also being tested and put to use. It’s another way to take operators out of harm’s way, centralize operations and cut costs and environmental footprints. But, there&rsq

Dr Phil Anderson and his kayak. Photo from SAMS.

@ SAMS, Science + Autonomy = Answers

Few sea and ocean-related research projects today do not involve some form of underwater robotic or marine autonomous system. Elaine Maslin reports on how they’re being used by the Scottish Association of Marine Science.Whether it’s large autonomous underwater vehicles (AUVs), remotely operated vehicles (ROVs), gliders, landers, small man-portable AUV systems and even air-borne vehicles, unmanned systems have become a day-to-day tool. And, while ready built systems are now readily available, easy access to components is enabling researchers to assemble bespoke platforms to meet specific

Johan Sverdrup subsea layout (Image: Equinor)

Uptick for Subsea Tree Installs Coming

project activity is already above 2013 levels, and it’s going to stay consistently high in coming years, says Bjørvik, with the subsea market driven more broadly by a lot by activity in Norway but also by Petrobras in Brazil, through floating projects.Henning Bjørvik (Photo: Elaine Maslin)Subsea tree demandThat increase in activity has seen subsea tree demand – a key indicator – increase. Subsea tree demand dropped to below 100 trees awarded in 2016, compared with about 530 in 2013, marking a low point for the industry. Bjørvik says that in 2022-2023, close

L3 Harris UK’s C-Worker 7 working with an ROV off the UK’s south coast. Photos from L3 Harris UK.

Hybrid Autonomous Systems Evolve

Marine autonomous systems and combinations of such systems are being increasingly put to the test in the offshore space. Elaine Maslin looks at how hybrid remote and autonomous systems are now being tested.Concepts like resident subsea vehicles, for inspection, repair and maintenance, are attractive options, but not the only ones being tried. Deploying remotely operated vehicles (ROVs) from unmanned surface vessels (USVs) are also being tested and put to use. It’s another way to take operators out of harm’s way, centralize operations and cut costs and environmental footprints. But, there&rsq

NotiloPlus’ Seasam AUV has been operating around the world. Photo from NotiloPlus.

Subsea Tech's 'March of Miniaturization'

A growing battalion of small, compact systems is marching in on the subsea world, in some ways making it a bigger space for more to enter. Elaine Maslin reports.Smaller remotely operated vehicles (ROVs) and smaller autonomous underwater vehicles (AUVs) are growing in number and in turn driving smaller technologies that support them. The result is a few new kids on the block and what you could call a rising march of miniaturization.They span from vehicle manufacturers to acoustic and optical sensor system makers. A number of these attended a demonstration event focused on unmanned systems in the

The docking station used in Sweden by Saab Seaeye (Photo: Elaine Maslin)

It’s Only Just the Start for Subsea Drones

Stinger AS and a drone from French firm Notilo Plus, attracted hundreds of people involved in this segment of the industry to the otherwise quiet town of Tau, near Stavanger.  Rune Aase, VP, Equinor speaks at an event marking the largest gathering of resident robotic systems to date. (Photo: Elaine Maslin)Equinor VP Rune Aase told the event: “This technology is an enabler. It’s an enabler for unlocking new ways of working, transforming the way we’re working and, not least, reducing CO2 footprint and increasing competitiveness on the Norwegian Continental Shelf and internationally

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