Friday, September 24, 2021
New Wave Media

August 28, 2017

Subsea Commerce in the Arctic Ocean

  • The submarine cargo transportation system is designed to transport LNG beneath the Arctic Ocean's ice cap and elsewhere. It only has to be submerged deep enough to avoid striking the ice above. Since the sea ice cap is not that thick the sub only has to be strong enough to withstand relatively low depth pressure. (Image: Novan Research)
  • A submarine cargo system shows the cargo submarine being pushed by a nuclear powered submarine. It is using the propulsion and electrical power generated by the submarine's nuclear energy. The cargo submarine can travel under its own diesel/electric power when conditions are suitable. (Image: Novan Research)
  • The submarine cargo transportation system is designed to transport LNG beneath the Arctic Ocean's ice cap and elsewhere. It only has to be submerged deep enough to avoid striking the ice above. Since the sea ice cap is not that thick the sub only has to be strong enough to withstand relatively low depth pressure. (Image: Novan Research) The submarine cargo transportation system is designed to transport LNG beneath the Arctic Ocean's ice cap and elsewhere. It only has to be submerged deep enough to avoid striking the ice above. Since the sea ice cap is not that thick the sub only has to be strong enough to withstand relatively low depth pressure. (Image: Novan Research)
  • A submarine cargo system shows the cargo submarine being pushed by a nuclear powered submarine. It is using the propulsion and electrical power generated by the submarine's nuclear energy. The cargo submarine can travel under its own diesel/electric power when conditions are suitable. (Image: Novan Research) A submarine cargo system shows the cargo submarine being pushed by a nuclear powered submarine. It is using the propulsion and electrical power generated by the submarine's nuclear energy. The cargo submarine can travel under its own diesel/electric power when conditions are suitable. (Image: Novan Research)

Recent years have seen a rapid increase in surface shipping operations in Arctic regions but nothing has been done for the subsea commercial shipping. New submarine technology to open up the Arctic Ocean's northern passage for year-round commerce is now technically feasible.

 
The voyage above the ice is extremely difficult exacerbated by extreme low temperatures, short warm season, thick icing of exposed topside equipment, changing ice cap movements, and a lack of suitable rescue search operations.
 
Faster cargo submarines, using direct routes across the Arctic Ocean would require less power and fuel could provide a greater economic advantage than larger more powerful surface ships.
 
There is a beautiful, relatively warm ocean just under the thin ice cap that covers the Arctic Ocean that could be used for many types commercial transportation possibilities. Transporting petroleum products such as liquefied natural gas (LNG) would be ideal for this type of shipping.
Arctic Oceannatural gaspetroleum products
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