Ocean Observation News Arctic_Operations

Photo: Cathx Ocean

Cathx Ocean Launches "Fast Fly" at OI18

Cathx Ocean, designer and manufacture advanced subsea imaging and precision measurement systems for machine learning, launched Fast Fly, its latest range of advanced imaging systems for fast vehicle operations. These include fast model, the next generation laser profilers for dense color point cloud and a dual mode wide-angle laser and still imaging system for general observation class remotely operated vehicle (ROV) operations. Visitors to Oceanology International 2018 in London can learn about Cathx Ocean’s range of application based services which supports existing and potential

Ocean surface currents around the world. (NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center Scientific Visualization Studio)

The Evolution of Ocean Models

During the 1970s, the first global ocean models emerged at research centers across the U.S. Back then, their construction was basic by modern standards, but like the models of today the researchers creating them aimed to simulate the world’s oceans by coding the mathematical equations of fluid motion on a sphere. Those efforts made use of the most sophisticated computing power available at the time, but realistic simulations of the ocean were years away.   Today, things have moved along.    Ocean modelers are much closer to simulating accurate representations of the real ocean

WOC Co-organizing International Workshop

WOC Co-organizing International Workshop on The World Ocean Council (WOC) and Canada’s Marine Environmental Observation Prediction and Response (MEOPAR) Network are co-organizing an international workshop to advance ocean industry data collecting and sharing. The event will set the stage for an initial Canadian Atlantic pilot project on ocean observations by industry, in support of Canada’s commitment to trans-Atlantic research under the “Galway Statement on Atlantic Ocean Cooperation,” with potential for future expansion to the Pacific and Arctic Oceans. The three-day

First Phase of The Ocean Enterprise Concluded

The Ocean Enterprise: A study of US business activity in ocean measurement, observation and forecasting.   The Maritime Alliance in conjunction with ERISS Corporation has just concluded the first phase of The Ocean Enterprise: A study of US Business activity in ocean measurement, observation and forecasting.  Sponsored by U.S. Integrated Ocean Observing System (IOOS), this first of its kind study will help determine the extent of United States private sector activity in support of ocean measurement, observation and forecasting and the use of ocean information to deliver safety, economic

Oceanography file image CCL

Navy's Global Ocean Forecast System Goes Public

The U.S. Naval Research Laboratory (NRL) & the National Center for Environmental Prediction (NCEP) within the National Ocean and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) have entered into a formal agreement that results in NCEP using Navy developed global ocean forecast model technology to make environmental ocean forecasts for public use. “Development of an advanced global ocean prediction system has been a long-term Navy interest,” said Dr. Gregg Jacobs, head, NRL Ocean Dynamics and Prediction Branch. “This use of Navy developed systems for global ocean forecasting represents dual

(Copyright: Alfred-Wegener-Institut / Folke Mehrtens)

A United Front in Ocean Observation

As the world’s oceans become increasingly exposed to rapidly growing pressures, long-term data sets are fundamental for monitoring these processes and understanding the complex and vast oceanic environment. In July 2016, the European Marine Board (EMB), a partnership of major national marine and oceanographic institutes in Europe, identified critical gaps within ocean observation and seafloor mapping capabilities. Their mission, along with many organizations and networks, is to unite existing ocean observing capacity and launch Europe into a time of ocean erudition.   For 20 years the EMB

Photo courtesy Liquid Robotics

Liquid Robotics, NOAA Sign Forecasting Agreement

Liquid Robotics and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) announced the signing of a multiyear, Cooperative Research & Development Agreement (CRADA) designed to advance ocean observations to improve U.S. weather forecasting, fisheries management and environmental monitoring. The NOAA/Liquid Robotics CRADA combines the significant product capabilities of the Wave Glider, a revolutionary, wave powered unmanned ocean robot, with NOAA’s engineering, data analysis and modeling expertise for applications that will have long-term benefits to the general public. "Over

Image courtesy of SeaOrbiter

Ocean Exploration Vessel Will Knock on Neptune's Door

A new ocean exploration vessel, 'SeaOrbiter' which the designer claims will provide permanent and continuous observation and research operations at the heart of the ocean is almost fully funded, ready to be built. Jacques Rougerie describes himself as a visionary architect who aims to deliver a new vision of underwater exploration with his SeaOrbiter, the culmination of over 30 years of research dedicated to bionic marine architecture and exploration of the undersea world. Internationally renowned, he lists among his achievements the Sea Pavilion in Kobe, Japan; the underwater archaeological museum

NOAA, NASA & BOEM to Monitor Biodiversity

NOAA, NASA and the Department of the Interior's Bureau of Ocean Energy Management (BOEM) have joined together to support three demonstration projects that will lay the foundation for the first national network to monitor marine biodiversity at scales ranging from microbes to whales. The projects, to be funded at approximately $17 million over the next five years, subject to the availability of funds, will demonstrate how a national operational marine biodiversity observation network could be developed. Such a network would serve as a marine resource management tool to conserve existing biodiversity

Forum Majore ROV (Photo: Forum Subsea Technology)

ROV Sales for Forum Subsea Announced

gas and renewables sectors.   The first sale is to an academic research facility in Russia. Awarded through Forum’s local distributor in the region - DiveTechnoService LLC  - the St Petersburg-based academic institution has selected one of the company’s Mojave ROVs to support its oceanography research work. It is one of the subsea industry’s most powerful observation vehicles of its size, and its compact design and lightweight construction allow for rapid set up and deployment suited to the subsea environment.   The other new contracts are repeat business with two

Image: IOOS

IOOS Awards $31 Mln for Ocean Observation

More than $31 million has been awarded in grants from the U.S. Integrated Ocean Observing System (IOOS) to support ocean, coastal and Great Lakes observing efforts throughout the United States, Caribbean and Pacific.   IOOS said the funds, which are to be distributed primarily as five-year cooperative agreements, are augmented by contributions from other federal offices and agencies, as well as outside groups including: National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration’s (NOAA) Office Oceanic and Atmospheric Research (OAR), NOAA’s Ocean Acidification Program (OAP), the National

Photo courtesy of NOC

$31.7m AtlantOS Project to Enhance Ocean Observation

The largest marine science project that the European Commission has ever funded, the $31.7 million AtlantOS project, is due to start in January 2015, bringing together a wide spectrum of scientific disciplines from more than 60 research organizations across the world to enhance the efficiency of ocean observation procedures. By fundamentally restructuring and integrating the existing, loosely-coordinated Atlantic ocean monitoring activities, as well as filling in the gaps, the multidisciplinary AtlantOS project will result in more efficient, more complete and lower cost information delivery.

Photo: Liquid Robotics

Liquid Robotics Closes $45 Million Series E Funding to Accelerate

led by Riverwood Capital, a growth-focused technology private equity firm, with participation from existing investors, including VantagePoint Capital Partners. The funding will be used to expand the Company’s global sales, partner and services organizations to meet the increasing demand for its ocean observation and monitoring services. This investment will also fund development and delivery of new cost effective solutions for the worldwide defense, science and research and oil and gas markets. “Liquid Robotics is driving a major shift in ocean observation and surveillance,” said

MTR100 '13 SubChem Systems, Inc.

in 1996, to focus on instrumentation technology for Underwater Chemical Sensing. The company develops, manufactures and sells, to the international market, a unique line of submersible chemical analyzers. The Tech: SubChem Analyzers are designed to be adaptable for deployment on a wide variety of ocean observation platforms including: shipboard profiling or towed sensor arrays, fixed-depth or vertical profiling moorings, autonomous underwater vehicles and gliders. It also provides environmental data collection and analysis software, environmental and ocean engineering consulting services, and technical

Air-drop Drifter Buoy: Photo courtesy of NOAA

Drifter Buoy 'Army' Patrols the Oceans

Insignificant on their own, but approximately 1,000 of them patrol the world's oceans to record key data for climate monitoring and research. In an era where 2-3 ton satellites that live 10 to 15 years collect millions of observations every day, the much smaller and shorter-lived drifting buoy, or "drifter," may seem like a lightweight—or even a relic. Each drifter is less than 22 feet long, tips the scales at no more than 100 pounds, and lives just 450 days on average. "Because the drifters provide a ground-truth of currents, they are great for combining with satellite

Arctic Monitoring Buoy: Photo credit NOAA

Arctic Ocean More Acidic? NOAA Deploys First Monitoring Buoy

NOAA’s Pacific Marine Environmental Laboratory in partnership with the Marine Research Institute in Iceland has deployed the first high-latitude ocean acidification monitoring buoy in the Atlantic Ocean. The moored buoy is the first of its kind to be deployed north of the Arctic circle in a region where very little is known about how carbon dioxide (CO2) is entering the ocean environment. The buoy, deployed north of Iceland, is equipped with a MAPCO2 monitoring system designed at PMEL that measures CO2 concentrations of the surface water and atmosphere every 90 minutes. The mooring

A satellite image shows Falkor’s track and the colors in ocean water. Colors indicate the amount of chlorophyll, where red is the highest and blue the lowest. (Image: NASA/ Norman Kuring)

New Tech Gives Insight to Ocean Color for NASA Satellites

Having recently returned to land on board Schmidt Ocean Institute’s (SOI) research vessel Falkor, NASA Scientists have made important observations of phytoplankton with new technology to support current and future satellite observations.   A swath of new instruments were debuted during a 25 day expedition across the Pacific exploring a wide variety of oceanic ecosystems. The focus of chief scientist Dr. Ivona Cetinic´, USRA/NASA, and her multidisciplinary team of oceanographers, engineers, biologists and computer scientists was to explore ocean particles, and more specifically the

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